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April 10, 2007

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You ought to post a comment about the Top 14 issue. Note that the commentor from Loyola referred to Fordham as a top school. IIRC, that's not among the Top 14.

Fordham is the 3rd best law school in New York City, so it's still a lot better than BLS.

I'll be honest, she isn't as pretty as I thought she'd be. I mean I wouldn't kick her out of bed or anything, but I really thought she would look like some of the girls of the Ivy league. My brother, lucky bastard he is, was "friendly" with one of the girls at college who posed some years ago.

I don't know if you answered this, but I've always wondered about the reputation of the CUNY Law School. I know it's nowhere near the Top 10, but it's absurdly cheap at $5K per semester.

I mean I wouldn't kick her out of bed or anything, but I really thought she would look like some of the girls of the Ivy league.

Judging from my visits to Boston and Philadelphia, UPenn and Harvard are lacking in attractive women. State and community colleges probably have more attractive women than the Ivies.

Isn't CUNY the school where most of the students have to take remedial courses once they get accepted? But at $5,000 a semester, it is a frickin' steal. I could always get that degree in Religion I always wanted. Don't know what I'd do with it though.

CUNY's senior college tuition is IIRC, $2K per semester. The senior colleges have tightened up admissions criteria, so yes, some of the students take remedial courses, but senior colleges are steering those students to the community colleges and secondary colleges like York College or Medgar Evers. The high numbers of students taking remedial courses is a sign of the poor state of New York high schools. I'll give some credit to the students for wanting to go to college instead of sitting around doing nothing. It's also a good by policy by CUNY instead of letting the students slide through and having them graduate with awful skills that would impugn on the reputation of the colleges.

CUNY happens to also run a law school near Queens College with tuition at $5K per semester, but CUNY does not run a medical school.

DA,
When I was at school in Philadelphia, Villanova was known for its attractive female student body. And, no, I didn't go to Villanova, but I can attest to that fact, at least when I was down there. Penn State has lots of good looking babes too, but I suspect any big state school would due to the sheer size of the students enrolled. However, I was playing hockey out at Montclair State here in NJ and I have to say I was pleasantly surprised at the number of good looking females walking around. Montclair State has lots of commuting and grad students who are older so that probably helps.

Here you have an average, yet cute looking woman. She would be in my league, and I do like her.

I work in a court room and ID attorneys (the workers not the owners) are invariably good looking women. They look through you the same way a pretty girl would in high school. Excellent trial technique.

The fact that this is considered any kind of scandal just shows how outdated society's expectations are regarding law school and lawyers. Kind of like people used to get excited when college women posed nude.

Being a lawyer, or at least dressing like one, does seem to rivet a certain type of man. Unfortunately, it's the type of man who only deals with lawyers when The People are paying for one.

Interesting link to the tell-all site for insurance defense. Yep, it's pretty much a pit. Although a $50K salary is a bit low, I'd say typical is more $70-$80 for new associates. But I have heard of places that pay as low as $45K. I've heard of insurance companies who've negotiated rates as low as $95/hour. And yes, the only thing many seem to care about in hiring women is what they look like and that they're not likely to get pregnant. That doesn't mean you get to stick around, though, because there's a new, desperate crop of youngsters to choose from every year.

Oh, I just got the double entendre in "gets spanked," yeah. So true.

She's pretty cute, just needs to stop bleching her hair (damn Latins drive me nuts with that stuff sometimes).

I'll second the comment about hotties at Villanova, based on when I visited there 9 years ago anyway. George Washington in DC has a lot of hotties for a good school.

She's pretty cute, just needs to stop bleching her hair (damn Latins drive me nuts with that stuff sometimes).

Nah, she would look better if her hair was a just a bit darker (like a dirty blonde or a light brown). Italian and Hispanic chicks look better if they lighten their hair a bit since their natural hair color tends to be black or dark brown. The problem is they tend to go overboard with the lightening.

Fordham is the 3rd best law school in New York City, so it's still a lot better than BLS.

What determines a "top" law school? I have usually heard of people talk about the "Top 20" law schools. This website introduced me to the "Top 14" concept.

I guess a side question is which schools are tier 1 and which schools are tier 2 schools?

For instance, are the law schools at UCLA, USC, and U of Texas-Austin first tier or second tier?

What determines a "top" law school? I have usually heard of people talk about the "Top 20" law schools. This website introduced me to the "Top 14" concept.
I guess a side question is which schools are tier 1 and which schools are tier 2 schools?

It isn't a matter of tiers. From an employment-opportunities perspective, there are the Top 14 law school, and there is everything else. Basically, if you graduate from a Top 14 law school you have all sorts of excellent opportunities, while if you graduate from any other law school, no matter what its outside-the-Top-14 relative ranking may be, you'll be lucky to have even a lower-middle class life.

Basically, if you graduate from a Top 14 law school you have all sorts of excellent opportunities, while if you graduate from any other law school, no matter what its outside-the-Top-14 relative ranking may be, you'll be lucky to have even a lower-middle class life.

Peter, what are you basing this on? Even HS never went that far.

I suspect you're just eager to steer people away from law as a career because lawyers tend to wear suits, to which you have a pathological aversion.

Even HS never went that far.

He's mentioned, many times, that he was unable to find a decent legal job despite having a degree from a fairly well-known and well-regarded, but not Top 14, law school.

I suspect you're just eager to steer people away from law as a career because lawyers tend to wear suits, to which you have a pathological aversion.

Most of the SCA's that torment me on the train appear to be in the financial services industry. I base that primarily on the work stuff I see them doing on their computers and babbling about on their cell phones. Another significant thing is that the trains, at least from Ronkonkoma, are overwhelmingly male; the financial services industry is a famous fiesta de chorizo, while there are many women in law.


He's mentioned, many times, that he was unable to find a decent legal job despite having a degree from a fairly well-known and well-regarded, but not Top 14, law school.

All we actually know is that he couldn't get a job at a top firm right out of law school during a recession. And we know that he unlike many law graduates had the option to become a well-paid programmer, which he exercised.

It isn't a matter of tiers. From an employment-opportunities perspective, there are the Top 14 law school, and there is everything else. Basically, if you graduate from a Top 14 law school you have all sorts of excellent opportunities, while if you graduate from any other law school, no matter what its outside-the-Top-14 relative ranking may be, you'll be lucky to have even a lower-middle class life.

In real life, I don't know a single Top-14 law school graduate. I also don't know of a single one law school graduate that has trouble maintaining anything lower than a middle class lifestyle. I'm sure such people do exist, but where I've lived they are are not the norm.

"ID firms"? What's that mean?

- Josh

Insurance Defense, I think.

What I don't buy is this sharp demarcation between the top 14. I'm sure you can get screwed out of Arizona State, but I think it's more likely you get progressively decreasing opportunities as you go down the line. Do you really think law school number 15 is so bad?

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