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Half Sigma on drugs

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Because I am no longer a pure libertarian, and I believe in HBD, I now understand the following two facts: (1) sometimes it is the proper responsibility of government to protect people from themselves; and (2) people with low IQs or addictive personalities (both inherited personality traits) are unable to look out for their own interests.

But I still believe that the government has gone too far in the “war on drugs.” I think that the cost of the “war” and the collateral damage to freedom and liberty is greater than the benefit of keeping drugs out of the hands of the irresponsible.

It seems to me that the “drug war” only prevents responsible middle class people from buying drugs. I wouldn’t know where to get illegal drugs if I wanted to. But somehow, all of the poor and stupid people, those who need the most protection from drugs, all know where to get the stuff despite their illegality.

weedThe drug war has also failed in that college kids commonly do drugs, and in fact there’s an aura of uncoolness among those who have actually obeyed the law and never partook of illegal drugs. Even President Obama admitted to using marijuana and cocaine. I think the acceptance that violating the law is a “cool” thing to do is indicative of our nation’s moral decay independent of drug issues, but that’s a different topic.

There’s an argument to be made that our country would have been better off had there been a successfully prosecuted drug war, but I think that it’s time to admit defeat and move on.

Why is it that prohibition lasted only a few years and was repealed by constitutional amendment (which requires strong super-majority support) but this war on drugs goes on forever? Clearly, government programs have a lot more inertia behind them today than they did in the 1920s and 1930s.

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